FAU New York State Chapter

New York is a state in the northeastern United States, and is the 27th-most extensive, fourth-most populous, and seventh-most densely populated U.S. state.  The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population of New York was 19,795,791 on July 1, 2015, a 2.16% increase since the 2010 United States Census. and is often referred to as New York State to distinguish it from New York City, the state’s most populous city and its economic hub.

With an estimated population of 8.55 million in 2015, New York City is the most populous city in the United States of America.  The New York City Metropolitan Area is one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world. New York City is a global city, exerting a significant impact upon commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and entertainment, its fast pace defining the term New York minute.

New York’s gross state product in 2015 was $1.44 trillion. If New York State were an independent nation, it would rank as the 12th or 13th largest economy in the world, depending upon international currency fluctuations.  However in 2013, the multi-state, New York City-centered Metropolitan Statistical Area produced a gross metropolitan product (GMP) of nearly US$1.39 trillion, while in 2012, the corresponding Combined Statistical Area generated a GMP of over US$1.55 trillion, both ranking first nationally by a wide margin and behind the GDP of only twelve nations and eleven nations, respectively.


According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the 2010 racial makeup of New York State was as follows by self-identification:[95]

New York City makes up over 40% of the population of New York State. Two-thirds of the state’s population lives in the New York City Metropolitan Area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.

Racial composition 1950[96] 1970[96] 1990[96] 2000[97] 2010[98]
White 93.5% 86.8% 74.4% 67.9% 65.8%
Black 6.2% 11.9% 15.9% 15.9% 15.9%
Asian 0.2% 0.7% 3.9% 5.5% 7.3%
Native 0.1% 0.2% 0.3% 0.4% 0.6%
Native Hawaiian and
other Pacific Islander
0.1% 0.1%
Other race 0.4% 5.5% 7.1% 7.4%
Two or more races 3.1% 3.0%

New York is home to the second-largest African American population (after Georgia) and the second largest Asian-American population (after California) in the United States. New York’s uniracial Black population increased by 2.0% between 2000 and 2010, to 3,073,800. The Black population is in a state of flux, as New York is the largest recipient of immigrants from Africa, while established African Americans are migrating out of New York to the southern United States. The  New York City neighborhood of Harlem has historically been a major cultural capital for African-Americans of sub-Saharan descent, and Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn has the largest such population in the United States.

Meanwhile, New York’s uniracial Asian population increased by a notable 36% from 2000 to 2010, to 1,420,244. Queens, in New York City, is home to the state’s largest Asian-American population and is the most ethnically diverse county in the United States; it is the most ethnically diverse urban area in the world.

The Chinese population constitutes the fastest-growing nationality in New York State; multiple satellites of the original Manhattan Chinatown (曼哈頓華埠), in Brooklyn (布鲁克林華埠), and around Flushing, Queens (法拉盛華埠), are thriving as traditionally urban enclaves, while also expanding rapidly eastward into suburban Nassau County (拿騷縣), on Long Island (長島). New York State has become the top destination for new Chinese immigrants, and large-scale Chinese immigration continues into the state. A new China City of America is also planned in Sullivan County.

Long Island, including Queens and Nassau County, is also home to several Little Indias (लघु भारत) and a large Koreatown (롱 아일랜드 코리아타운), with large and growing attendant populations of Indian Americans and Korean Americans, respectively. Brooklyn has been a destination for West Indian immigrants of African descent, as well as Asian Indian immigrants.

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish (יהודי) residents in Brooklyn. Brooklyn’s rapidly expanding Jewish community is the largest in the United States, with approximately 600,000 individuals.


These are the ten counties with the largest populations as of 2010:

  1. Kings County (Brooklyn): 2,504,700
  2. Queens County (Queens): 2,230,722
  3. New York County (Manhattan): 1,585,873
  4. Suffolk County: 1,493,350
  5. Bronx County (the Bronx): 1,385,108
  6. Nassau County: 1,339,532
  7. Westchester County: 949,113
  8. Erie County: 919,040
  9. Monroe County: 744,344
  10. Richmond County (Staten Island): 468,730

There are 62 cities in New York.   The largest city in the state and the most populous city in the United States is New York City, which comprises five counties (each coextensive with a borough): Bronx, New York County (Manhattan), Queens, Kings County (Brooklyn), and Richmond County (Staten Island).

City County Population [1]
(2011 census estimate)
Incorporation
date
New York Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond 8,550,405 1653[B]
Buffalo Erie 261,025 1832
Rochester Monroe 210,855 1834
Yonkers Westchester 197,399 1872
Syracuse Onondaga 145,151 1848
Albany Albany 97,660 1686